Skip to main content

Visual CVs in the English Classes: Writing for the 21 Century!!


noresumeIt's no question that the notion of literacy has transcended beyond the written word to include the combination of visuals and words. Writing skills has also evolved into the art of combining the written word with visuals such as images and videos. Our students themselves are disengaged from the writing and are more tuned in to the “Visual Word”.
For the past two years, I have turned the common CV assignments, part of the writing sessions with my grade 11 students, into Visual CV assignments. The results were remarkable, and I am writing this post to share it with you.
I was first fascinated by the visual CVs when I came across some. Professionals using PowerPoint + images + words to produce stunning visual CVs and resumes that stand out. I first did my own visual resume and decided that my students should also do it, besides their traditional paper CVs.

Students first wrote their traditional paper CVs which would serve as the basis for their Visual CVs. As high school students, they didn’t have enough experience or skills to make their CVs. So, I encouraged them to pretend they are now working in the profession they envision themselves doing and write down the experiences, education and skills that they would have gained along the way.
After they were done with the first part of their assignment, the paper CVs, I modeled some great visual Resumes. This gave the class enough material to discuss. They had to deconstruct those visual resumes, and we discussed what made them so communicative. By the end of the discussion, students came to realize that images mean more than words and that’s what they did.
Guided by their paper CVs each student chose keywords and turned them into images on their CVs. Each students started a Google presentation and shared it with me. This enabled me to give each one of them timely comments and suggestions. After they were done, each presented before the class and each shared his Visual CV on the internet. Below are some example of visual CV’s produced by my students.















Students were completely engaged. Their attitude towards writing has shifted to pleasure writing. Their motivation was heightened. But what was really remarkable is how low-achievers have improved in their writings. This is due to strengthening their willingness to communicate through not only text but also images using PowerPoint as a tool and the Google platform as a medium for communication and collaboration.

Comments

  1. Hello Kip, yes that are many visual CV platforms out there, visualcv.com is one of them. One can think of many tools to build his visual cvs, from linkedin to facebook pages to eportfolio software such as rcampus, Mahara and much more. What my students have done is that they build their CVs from scratch with no pre-fornatted desing to guide them. And this gave them a sense of authority of their visual cvs....
    They are currently building thier eportfolios using Google sites :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm a teacher from Bulgaria. Your experience is a great!!! I will do this with my students in the new school year. Thanks :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hey Дина, I am glad viual CVs resonated with your. You have to be aware however that you need to consider students' prerequisites. This means, you need to ask the question, do they have prior knowledge in using this particular technology? If the answer is yes, then you can go ahead with designing your lesson. However, if the answer is not, then you need to include a step prior to this lesson in familiarizing the features the students will be using in Powerpoint, for example. This is because we do not want a learning curve where the students focus on how to operate this tool than how to use this tool to communicate.
    Note also that you can use tools other than Powerpoint such as photostory or windowe movie maker.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I really appreciate your post and you explain each and every point very well.Thanks for sharing this information.And I’ll love to read your next post too.Will certainly visit your site more often now.

    liva

    ReplyDelete
  5. You can use positive language skills to exhibit yourself as a helpful, constructive person rather than a destructive, disinterested one. Positive body language involves the act of maintaining eye contact while speaking, using hand gestures to accentuate important points, leaning in closer while someone else is speaking, smiling, and mirroring the person you’re involved in a conversation with.

    liva

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks For sharing this very useful post, I like this post.
    Exam Cram

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks for the sharing nice information but i have one confusion if you have new method then please share me. Please!

    TestKiller

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Edmodo: A Microblogging Educational Platform

I’ve been aware of edmodo for quite a time now though I have never had the chance to use it with my students yet, as the scholastic year did not start yet.
What is Edmodo?
We all know twitter as a social networking platform and a microblogging platform for language learners right!!! The thing is that twitter does not have the security that our students need for safe microblogging. This is where edmodo comes in with its enhanced new features.


Simply put, Edmodo is a microblogging platform for education. You notice this on the home page of edmodo where there you can sign up as a teacher or a student.

Once you enter as a teacher you have to create an account to use edmodo. Your pesonal page contains all the features you need to connect with your students. You can upload assignments with files, link to urls, embed videos, or post a note.
The security in edmodo is that you have to create a group to connect to. Once this is done, you are given a code which in turn you give to your students.…

Moodle 2 Interactive Tool Guide for Teachers

Moodle has been at the forefront of online learning for learning institutions. And, since it is open source, and free for all, it is common that the community that benefit from Moodle to give back in various ways. One such help comes in Moodle Tool Guide for Teachers. It was first done by Joyce Seitzinger, and then adapted to Moodle 2 by Sue Harper.

I have added the feature of interactivity to the guide however. By adding videos to the tool, anyone who wants to learn how to use any tool can just click on the interactive layer and watch the video. I surely hope this helps teachers learn Moodle tools easily and know how each tool affords different learning outcome.

I will hopefully later add more interactivity in terms of instructional design, such as Bloom's taxonomy, assessing learning etc.






The 4 E model for Pedagogical Technology

If you look at the image on the left, you will notice the four key components of technology integration, what Collis & moonen (2002) refer to as key components of “flexible learning in a digital world”. The components ( institution, implementation, pedagogy, and technology) are nested in each other, which means that each depends on and feeds from the other. The approach for the flexible learning can be seen in a top-down, that institution-wide to technological aspect, or in  a bottom-up, that is from the technological aspect all the way up to the institution.

The 4 E Model as a Guide: Collis & Moonen suggest a 4 E model that will guide anyone who wants to integrate flexible learning in each and all key components Ease of use Environment Personal Engagement Educational Effectiveness
Now, I will not go into details of the activity-flexibility abstract framework and its U pedagogical approach. All I want to focus on here is how the 4 E model would guide the teachers in adopting/adapting …